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July 4th - Happy Independence Day America!




I received the message below in an email from a friend. It was timely because I was listening to Napoleon Hill's classic motivational book, Think and Grow Rich on DVD in my car the other day, and they were discussing how our Founding Fathers had come together against overwhelming odds and sacrifices to put a plan in place to declare and secure the independence of our country. Napoleon Hill used their example as a means to show how goal setting and perseverance can accomplish great things. But it also made me think of what a wonderful country we live in, how the spirit of independence created our country and still thrives today.

 
 
 
Happy Independence Day!!!
 
 
Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence?

Five signers were captured by the British as traitors,
 and tortured before they died.

Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned.
 Two lost their sons serving in the Revolutionary Army; another had two sons captured.

Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or
 hardships of the Revolutionary War.

They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes,
 and their sacred honor.

What kind of men were they?

Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists.
 Eleven were merchants, nine were farmers and large plantation owners; men of means, well educated, but they signed the Declaration of Independence knowing full well that the penalty would be death if they were captured. Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader, saw his ships swept from the seas by the British Navy. He sold his home and properties to pay his debts, and died in rags.

Thomas McKeam was so hounded by the British
 that he was forced to move his family almost constantly. He served in the Congress without pay, and his family was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him, and poverty was his reward.

Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Dillery, Hall, Clymer,
 Walton, Gwinnett, Heyward, Ruttledge, and Middleton.

At the battle of Yorktown , Thomas Nelson, Jr., noted that
 the British General Cornwallis had taken over the Nelson home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General George Washington to open fire. The home was destroyed, and Nelson died bankrupt.

Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed.
 The enemy jailed his wife, and she died within a few months.

John Hart was driven from his wife's bedside as she was dying.
 Their 13 children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill were laid to waste. For more than a year he lived in forests and caves, returning home to find his wife dead and his children vanished.  
 
 So, take a few minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday and silently thank these patriots. It's not much to ask for the price they paid.

Remember: freedom is never free!

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